Frogs of Borneo

Amphibians of Borneo


A photographic collection of amphibians from the island of borneo

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Update 2018. This site was down for over a year, glad to finally have it back and running. No changes have been made.
  • ANURA
    • Bufonidae.

        Ansonia hanitschi

        Ansonia hanitschi Ansonia hanitschi Ansonia hanitschi Ansonia hanitschi Ansonia hanitschi

        Ansonia leptopus
        These were mostly males calling from several metres from a riverbank, with a high pitched rolling call. I think some of the ones from Tawau Hills park have been missidentified, perhaps Ansonia longidigita.
        Ansonia leptopus Ansonia leptopus Ansonia leptopus Ansonia leptopus Ansonia leptopus

        Ansonia longidigita

        Ansonia longidigita Ansonia longidigita Ansonia longidigita Ansonia longidigita Ansonia longidigita

        Ansonia minuta
        A tiny toad, usually seen sitting on low vegetation. In terms of colouration, they are almost identical to the Pelophryne sp. (below), but they have a very different shape, whith long thing legs, and a long snout.
        Ansonia minuta Ansonia minuta Ansonia minuta Ansonia minuta Ansonia minuta

        Ansonia spinulifer

        Ansonia spinulifer Ansonia spinulifer Ansonia spinulifer Ansonia spinulifer Ansonia spinulifer

        Ansonia sp. (krayan)
        This is probably an unnamed species. They look quite like A. longidigita, althogh they were much smaller (calling males were between 3.2 and 3.5cm) with a red-bronze iris. The males were almost always found calling above small waterfalls in streams perhaps 2m wide.
        Ansonia sp. (krayan) Ansonia sp. (krayan) Ansonia sp. (krayan) Ansonia sp. (krayan) Ansonia sp. (krayan)

        Duttaphrynus melanostictus
        These stocky toads are pretty much everywhere in Asia, thriving around people. They are apparantly not native to Borneo, but their close affiliaton with people makes introductions inevitable.
        Duttaphrynus melanostictus Duttaphrynus melanostictus Duttaphrynus melanostictus Duttaphrynus melanostictus Duttaphrynus melanostictus

        Ingerophrynus divergens
        These were found in almost all lowland forests. The ones from Tarakan look different, this may be due to a life outside the forest, or they could be another similar species such as I. biporcatus, (common in Java and Bali.)
        Ingerophrynus divergens Ingerophrynus divergens Ingerophrynus divergens Ingerophrynus divergens Ingerophrynus divergens

        Ingerophrynus quadriporcatus
        I only found one individual of this species, the adults are usually less red in colour.
        Ingerophrynus quadriporcatus Ingerophrynus quadriporcatus Ingerophrynus quadriporcatus

        Pedostibes hosii
        A spectacular toad, which is a very adept climber, occasionally seen sitting high above rivers and streams.
        Pedostibes hosii Pedostibes hosii Pedostibes hosii Pedostibes hosii Pedostibes hosii

        Pelophryne api
        Tiny little toad, seen calling on leaves around limestone outcrops.
        Pelophryne api Pelophryne api Pelophryne api Pelophryne api Pelophryne api

        Pelophryne misera
        These were seen in the high-montane forests, especially where there was lots of moss.
        Pelophryne misera Pelophryne misera Pelophryne misera Pelophryne misera Pelophryne misera

        Pelophryne signata

        Pelophryne signata Pelophryne signata Pelophryne signata Pelophryne signata Pelophryne signata

        Pelophryne sp.

        Pelophryne sp Pelophryne sp Pelophryne sp Pelophryne sp Pelophryne sp

        Phrynoidis aspera
        River toad.
        Phrynoidis aspera Phrynoidis aspera Phrynoidis aspera Phrynoidis aspera Phrynoidis aspera

        Phrynoidis juxtaspera
        A spectacular, very large, river toad
        Phrynoidis juxtaspera Phrynoidis juxtaspera Phrynoidis juxtaspera Phrynoidis juxtaspera Phrynoidis juxtaspera

        Bufonidae sp
        This juvenile was found sitting on a leaf. Something so tiny is difficult to identify, It may well be Ingerophrynus divergens.
        Bufonidae sp Bufonidae sp Bufonidae sp Bufonidae sp Bufonidae sp
    • Ceratobatrachidae

        Ingerana baluensis
        A pretty odd species, in a family all of it's own.
        Ingerana baluensis Ingerana baluensis Ingerana baluensis Ingerana baluensis Ingerana baluensis
    • Dicroglossidae

        Fejervarya cancrivora
        Crab-eating frog. A large, widespread species. Some of these photos may be of Hoplobatrachus rugulosus; I dont know the difference.
        Fejervarya cancrivora Fejervarya cancrivora Fejervarya cancrivora Fejervarya cancrivora Fejervarya cancrivora

        Fejervarya limnocharis
        Grass Frog. Another species which thrives around people, I've never seen this species away from human disturbance. A couple of the photos from Similajau national park, Sarawak, might be of other species.
        Fejervarya limnocharis Fejervarya limnocharis Fejervarya limnocharis Fejervarya limnocharis Fejervarya limnocharis

        Limnonectes finchi
        Rough guardian frog. These are quite common in Sabah. I have been lucky enough to see a couple of males carrying their tadpoles.
        Limnonectes finchi Limnonectes finchi Limnonectes finchi Limnonectes finchi Limnonectes finchi

        Limnonectes ibanorum
        NEW note: This species is probably not Limnonectes ibanorum, probably L. ingeri . Thanks to Oliver Konopik for pointing this out.
        Limnonectes ibanorum Limnonectes ibanorum Limnonectes ibanorum Limnonectes ibanorum Limnonectes ibanorum

        Limnonectes ingeri

        Limnonectes ingeri Limnonectes ingeri Limnonectes ingeri Limnonectes ingeri Limnonectes ingeri

        Limnonectes kuhlii
        A very widely distributed species across a range of habitats.
        Limnonectes kuhlii Limnonectes kuhlii Limnonectes kuhlii Limnonectes kuhlii Limnonectes kuhlii

        Limnonectes cf kuhlii
        These ones from around Mt Kinabalu HQ may be distinct from the lowland ones, in their ability to call, and larger size.
        Limnonectes cf kuhlii Limnonectes cf kuhlii Limnonectes cf kuhlii Limnonectes cf kuhlii Limnonectes cf kuhlii

        Limnonectes laticeps
        A small species, similar to L. kuhlii, but live in a different habitat, and do not have fully webbed feet.
        Limnonectes laticeps Limnonectes laticeps Limnonectes laticeps Limnonectes laticeps

        Limnonectes cf. laticeps
        These individuals were seen around Gunung Gading natioanl park. They look similar to both L. laticeps and L. kuhlii, but are too large to be laticeps (these ones were up to 7cm), and do not have fully webbed feet (kuhlii have fully webbed feet). These were found in clear small streams and rivers, with granite grit and boulders. L. laticeps were seen nearby, in small, seep/stream with almost still puddles and accumilated leaf litter.
        Limnonectes cf. laticeps Limnonectes cf. laticeps Limnonectes cf. laticeps Limnonectes cf. laticeps Limnonectes cf. laticeps

        Limnonectes leporinus
        These are commonly seen in lowland forest, although they seem a lot less common outside protected areas (people eat them).
        Limnonectes leporinus Limnonectes leporinus Limnonectes leporinus Limnonectes leporinus Limnonectes leporinus

        Limnonectes malesianus

        Limnonectes malesianus Limnonectes malesianus Limnonectes malesianus Limnonectes malesianus Limnonectes malesianus

        Limnonectes palavanensis
        Smooth guardian frog.
        Limnonectes palavanensis Limnonectes palavanensis Limnonectes palavanensis Limnonectes palavanensis Limnonectes palavanensis

        Limnonectes paramacrodon

        Limnonectes paramacrodon Limnonectes paramacrodon Limnonectes paramacrodon Limnonectes paramacrodon Limnonectes paramacrodon

        Limnonectes spp.
        At first I really struggled with identifying Limnonectes. Most of these are older photos, which are not clear enough to identify. Most of them are probably laticeps/kuhlii, or L. paramacrodon. The two dark individuals may be the poorly known Limnonectes kenepaiensis.
        Limnonectes spp. Limnonectes spp. Limnonectes spp. Limnonectes spp. Limnonectes spp.

        Occidozyga baluensis
        These were commonly seen in puddles along trails.
        Occidozyga baluensis Occidozyga baluensis Occidozyga baluensis Occidozyga baluensis Occidozyga baluensis

        Occidozyga laevis
        Some of these photos might be O. baluensis.
        Occidozyga laevis Occidozyga laevis Occidozyga laevis Occidozyga laevis Occidozyga laevis
    • Megophryidae.

        Leptobrachella sp
        I didn't see any of these in my first trip to Kubah national park. Revisiting again, they were everywhere. Once I was familiar with the call, I found them in allsorts of habitats, from medium sized rivers, to a tiny stream flowing inside a ditch near to the gunung Serapi summit (above 750m). A really tiny frog with a really load call! They are probably either Leptobrachella parva or L. mjobergi, I don't yet know the difference.
        Leptobrachella sp Leptobrachella sp Leptobrachella sp Leptobrachella sp Leptobrachella sp

        Leptobrachium abbotti
        These were common in lowland forests. The ones in Sabah often had bold black markings underneith, but sometimes these were just light grey or absent.
        Leptobrachium abbotti Leptobrachium abbotti Leptobrachium abbotti Leptobrachium abbotti Leptobrachium abbotti

        Leptobrachium gunungense
        I think all of these are L. gunungense, one was heard calling with multiple notes, and the others were seen at about 1800m+ altitude (outside the range of the similar L. montanum)
        Leptobrachium gunungense Leptobrachium gunungense Leptobrachium gunungense Leptobrachium gunungense Leptobrachium gunungense

        Leptobrachium montanum
        I probably saw many of these, but they are difficult to differentiate from L. gunungense. These individuals were calling with a single note. I did not directly see any of them calling though, so cant be sure!
        Leptobrachium montanum Leptobrachium montanum Leptobrachium montanum Leptobrachium montanum

        Leptobrachium nigrops
        These are quite small and slender compared with the other Leptobrachium in borneo, at a gla nce the males could be confused with Leptolalax. One pair was seen in amplexus, although I thought the female was a L. abbotti.
        Leptobrachium nigrops Leptobrachium nigrops Leptobrachium nigrops Leptobrachium nigrops Leptobrachium nigrops

        Montane Leptobrachium sp.
        L. gunungense and L. montanum are pretty much indistinguishable. They differ in attitudinal range and call, the area I walked is within both species ranges, and I could hear both species calling in the area.
        Montane Leptobrachium sp. Montane Leptobrachium sp. Montane Leptobrachium sp. Montane Leptobrachium sp. Montane Leptobrachium sp.

        Leptolalax arayai

        Leptolalax arayai Leptolalax arayai Leptolalax arayai Leptolalax arayai Leptolalax arayai

        Leptolalax dringi

        Leptolalax dringi Leptolalax dringi Leptolalax dringi Leptolalax dringi Leptolalax dringi

        Leptolalax gracilis
        These were common in Sarawak. They seem larger than L. dringi, and can commonly be heard calling quite loudly from areas of rotten twigs and leaf-litter.
        Leptolalax gracilis Leptolalax gracilis Leptolalax gracilis Leptolalax gracilis Leptolalax gracilis

        Leptolalax hamidi

        Leptolalax hamidi Leptolalax hamidi Leptolalax hamidi Leptolalax hamidi Leptolalax hamidi

        Leptolalax maurus
        This individual was seen in the cool montane forests of Mt Kinabalu national park, the only place it is known.
        Leptolalax maurus Leptolalax maurus Leptolalax maurus Leptolalax maurus Leptolalax maurus

        Leptolalax sp
        At first I thought these were L. pictus, because the individuals I saw were light with clear black spots, and had rough skin with almost ridges instead of warts. However, upon returning to kinabalu park for the last few days of my holiday, I saw many which looked much more like L. dringi, and many in between.
        Leptolalax sp Leptolalax sp Leptolalax sp Leptolalax sp Leptolalax sp

        Leptolalax sp (Krayan)
        I found this individual sitting on a leaf near a stream, in submontane forest.
        Leptolalax sp (Krayan) Leptolalax sp (Krayan) Leptolalax sp (Krayan) Leptolalax sp (Krayan) Leptolalax sp (Krayan)

        Megophrys kobayashii

        Megophrys kobayashii Megophrys kobayashii Megophrys kobayashii Megophrys kobayashii Megophrys kobayashii

        Megophrys nasuta

        Megophrys nasuta Megophrys nasuta Megophrys nasuta Megophrys nasuta Megophrys nasuta

        Xenophrys baluensis

        Xenophrys baluensis Xenophrys baluensis Xenophrys baluensis Xenophrys baluensis Xenophrys baluensis
    • Microhylidae.

        Chaperina fusca
        All of the individuals from Tawau were found when carefully trying to follow a call of a different species, suggesting this species is common, yet rarely seen.
        Chaperina fusca Chaperina fusca Chaperina fusca Chaperina fusca Chaperina fusca

        Kalophrynus baluensis

        Kalophrynus baluensis Kalophrynus baluensis Kalophrynus baluensis Kalophrynus baluensis Kalophrynus baluensis

        Kalophrynus heterochirus

        Kalophrynus heterochirus Kalophrynus heterochirus Kalophrynus heterochirus Kalophrynus heterochirus Kalophrynus heterochirus

        Kalophrynus intermedius

        Kalophrynus intermedius Kalophrynus intermedius Kalophrynus intermedius Kalophrynus intermedius Kalophrynus intermedius

        Kalophrynus pleurostigma

        Kalophrynus pleurostigma Kalophrynus pleurostigma Kalophrynus pleurostigma Kalophrynus pleurostigma Kalophrynus pleurostigma

        Kaloula baleata

        Kaloula baleata Kaloula baleata Kaloula baleata Kaloula baleata Kaloula baleata

        Metaphrynella sundana

        Metaphrynella sundana Metaphrynella sundana Metaphrynella sundana Metaphrynella sundana Metaphrynella sundana

        Microhyla borneensis

        Microhyla borneensis Microhyla borneensis Microhyla borneensis Microhyla borneensis Microhyla borneensis

        Microhyla nepenthicola

        Microhyla nepenthicola Microhyla nepenthicola Microhyla nepenthicola Microhyla nepenthicola Microhyla nepenthicola

        Microhyla spp.

        Microhyla spp. Microhyla spp. Microhyla spp. Microhyla spp. Microhyla spp.

        Microhyla sp (mulu)

        Microhyla sp (mulu) Microhyla sp (mulu) Microhyla sp (mulu) Microhyla sp (mulu) Microhyla sp (mulu)
    • Ranidae.

        Huia cavitympanum

        Huia cavitympanum Huia cavitympanum Huia cavitympanum Huia cavitympanum Huia cavitympanum

        Hylarana baramica

        Hylarana baramica Hylarana baramica Hylarana baramica Hylarana baramica Hylarana baramica

        Hylarana erythreae

        Hylarana erythreae Hylarana erythreae Hylarana erythreae Hylarana erythreae Hylarana erythreae

        Hylarana glandulosa

        Hylarana glandulosa Hylarana glandulosa Hylarana glandulosa Hylarana glandulosa Hylarana glandulosa

        Hylarana lactuosa

        Hylarana lactuosa Hylarana lactuosa Hylarana lactuosa Hylarana lactuosa Hylarana lactuosa

        Hylarana megalonesa
        This species is very similar to H. raniceps, but is larger, and lives by streams and rivers.
        Hylarana megalonesa Hylarana megalonesa Hylarana megalonesa Hylarana megalonesa Hylarana megalonesa

        Hylarana nicobariensis

        Hylarana nicobariensis Hylarana nicobariensis Hylarana nicobariensis Hylarana nicobariensis Hylarana nicobariensis

        Hylarana picturata
        These are widespread frogs, usually seen sitting on the banks of small streams. The ones from the Krayan area, north Kalimantan Timur, were consistantly smaller (males maybe 3 – 3.5cm, females ~5.5cm and many idividuals, especially males, were very yellow, more marbled than spotted. These seem to be at least a distinct population.
        Hylarana picturata Hylarana picturata Hylarana picturata Hylarana picturata Hylarana picturata

        Hylarana raniceps
        These are an extremely common species in lowland forests. Some of these might be Hylarana megalonesa, a recently described, larger species, which is difficult to distinguish.
        Hylarana raniceps Hylarana raniceps Hylarana raniceps Hylarana raniceps Hylarana raniceps

        Hylarana signata

        Hylarana signata Hylarana signata Hylarana signata Hylarana signata Hylarana signata

        Meristogenys amoropalamus

        Meristogenys amoropalamus Meristogenys amoropalamus Meristogenys amoropalamus Meristogenys amoropalamus Meristogenys amoropalamus

        Meristogenys kinabaluensis

        Meristogenys kinabaluensis Meristogenys kinabaluensis Meristogenys kinabaluensis Meristogenys kinabaluensis Meristogenys kinabaluensis

        Meristogenys sp.
        Meristogenys are very difficult genus to identify. Among these photos are probably Meristogenys jerboa, Meristogenys orphnocnemis, Meristogenys phaeomerus, Meristogenys poecilus, Meristogenys whiteheadi, and maybe others (please ignore any exisiting names on the photos, i know at least some are incorrect).
        Meristogenys jerboa Meristogenys jerboa Meristogenys jerboa Meristogenys jerboa Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys orphnocnemis Meristogenys sp. Meristogenys sp. Meristogenys sp. Meristogenys sp. Meristogenys sp.

        Odorrana hosii

        Odorrana hosii Odorrana hosii Odorrana hosii Odorrana hosii Odorrana hosii

        Staurois guttatus
        These were common in lowland forests, around streams and rivers. During the night they tend to sit high on leaves, occasionally calling, whereas during the day they are active, occationally seen flashing their metallic blue feet.
        Staurois guttatus Staurois guttatus Staurois guttatus Staurois guttatus Staurois guttatus

        Staurois latopalmatus
        An awesome frog, seen sitting on boulders in strong rapids and waterfals.
        Staurois latopalmatus Staurois latopalmatus Staurois latopalmatus Staurois latopalmatus Staurois latopalmatus

        Staurois tuberilinguis

        Staurois tuberilinguis Staurois tuberilinguis Staurois tuberilinguis Staurois tuberilinguis Staurois tuberilinguis
    • Rhacophoridae.

        Nyctixalus pictus
        A beautiful little species, which is difficult to photograph to get it's true colour. In many photographs, the bright orange bleeds, while the white spots are bleached. There was one individual from Mt. Kinabalu which looked quite different, lacking the scattered white spots. This individual shows striking simularity to the montane Phillapino species, Nyctixalus spinosus.
        Nyctixalus pictus Nyctixalus pictus Nyctixalus pictus Nyctixalus pictus Nyctixalus pictus

        Philautis amoenus

        Philautis amoenus Philautis amoenus Philautis amoenus Philautis amoenus Philautis amoenus

        Philautus gunungensis

        Philautus gunungensis Philautus gunungensis Philautus gunungensis Philautus gunungensis Philautus gunungensis

        Philautus hosii
        This species is large for a Philautus, males around 4cm, and females up to about 6cm. They were quite abundant for a few nights. Most of the time these were found in pairs, the male calling with a repeated, soft tone, occasionally preceeded by a rapid succession of short notes. These were usually found near flowing water, from the tiniest seeps to large rivers. It has been suggested that they have free-living tadpoles. I believe, however, that they do not use the flowing water to breed, but the most, muddy banks found at all these habitats. One male was found with mud on its head, while calling to a female. In 2005, a new species was described, Polypedates chlorophthalmus, with a very similar appearance to these individuals.
        Philautus hosii Philautus hosii Philautus hosii Philautus hosii Philautus hosii

        Philautus mjobergi
        A little frog. These photos are from between 1500m and 1700m. These were heard more than seen, calling from low vegetation, with a series of about 8 chirps, sometimes a pause before the last one or two notes.
        Philautus mjobergi Philautus mjobergi Philautus mjobergi Philautus mjobergi Philautus mjobergi

        Philautus refugii
        These frogs were found in small patches, perhaps breeding congregations, in Kubah national park. A (low quality) recording of the call is available. They seem variable in colour and skin texture.
        Philautus refugii Philautus refugii Philautus refugii Philautus refugii Philautus refugii

        Philautus tectus
        These were seen in almost all lowland forests. The ones in Mulu national park were in a calling group, and seemed smaller than the ones seen elsewhere.
        Philautus tectus Philautus tectus Philautus tectus Philautus tectus Philautus tectus

        Philautus sp.(mulu)
        I found this pair of individuals around the area of a fallen tree, in Gunung Mulu national park. I first found the calling male, then the other, presumably a female, approached from several metres away. Notice the huge difference between the male and the female. If found alone I would be convinced that they were different species. Philautus are a very difficult genus to identify!
        Philautus sp.(mulu) Philautus sp.(mulu) Philautus sp.(mulu) Philautus sp.(mulu) Philautus sp.(mulu)

        Philautus sp. (Krayan)
        This is the only individual which I got a photo, of this tiny species. This looks similar to “Philautus mjoberi” I saw in Kinabalu, but the call was quite different; single chirps composed of two or 3 notes in rapid succession.
        Philautus sp. (Krayan) Philautus sp. (Krayan) Philautus sp. (Krayan) Philautus sp. (Krayan) Philautus sp. (Krayan)

        Polypedates colletti

        Polypedates colletti Polypedates colletti Polypedates colletti Polypedates colletti Polypedates colletti

        Polypedates leucomystax
        A very adaptable species which trives around people. I saw few in the forest, and this was on the boundary between dipterocarp forest and magrove. These can be striped, plain or spotted.
        Polypedates leucomystax Polypedates leucomystax Polypedates leucomystax Polypedates leucomystax Polypedates leucomystax

        Polypedates macrotis
        This species also shows polymorphism, with some individuals being spotted, some with two stripes, or some without any markings (except the dark stripe running from behind the eye.
        Polypedates macrotis Polypedates macrotis Polypedates macrotis Polypedates macrotis Polypedates macrotis

        Polypedates otilophis
        A very large treefrog, with sharp ridges above the eardrums, presumably a defence against predators such as snakes.
        Polypedates otilophis Polypedates otilophis Polypedates otilophis Polypedates otilophis Polypedates otilophis

        Rhacophorus angulirostris

        Rhacophorus angulirostris Rhacophorus angulirostris Rhacophorus angulirostris Rhacophorus angulirostris Rhacophorus angulirostris

        Rhacophorus appendicculatus

        Rhacophorus appendicculatus Rhacophorus appendicculatus Rhacophorus appendicculatus Rhacophorus appendicculatus Rhacophorus appendicculatus

        Rhacophorus cyanopunctatus

        Rhacophorus cyanopunctatus Rhacophorus cyanopunctatus Rhacophorus cyanopunctatus Rhacophorus cyanopunctatus Rhacophorus cyanopunctatus

        Rhacophorus dulitensis
        I only saw one individual of this spectacular species, which appeared to have a diseased eye.
        Rhacophorus dulitensis Rhacophorus dulitensis Rhacophorus dulitensis Rhacophorus dulitensis Rhacophorus dulitensis

        Rhacophorus everetti

        Rhacophorus everetti Rhacophorus everetti Rhacophorus everetti Rhacophorus everetti Rhacophorus everetti

        Rhacophorus cf gadingensis
        These individuals were seen in Kubah national park. They are much larger than the described R. gadingensis, and have white tubercles along the forearm and underneith the thigh. These features were some that distinguished the between R. gadingensis and the newly named R. belalongensis (Dehling and Grafe, 2008). Hopefully work is underway to sort out this species complex.
        Rhacophorus cf gadingensis Rhacophorus cf gadingensis Rhacophorus cf gadingensis Rhacophorus cf gadingensis Rhacophorus cf gadingensis

        Rhacophorus guani

        Rhacophorus guani Rhacophorus guani Rhacophorus guani Rhacophorus guani Rhacophorus guani

        Rhacophorus harrissoni
        These males were all about 4cm SVL, quite a bit smaller than R. harrissoni is often described (>50mm, Haas 2010). Theyre also desribed as “rather unspectacular”; for these individuals at least, I think they're pretty spectacular!
        Rhacophorus harrissoni Rhacophorus harrissoni Rhacophorus harrissoni Rhacophorus harrissoni Rhacophorus harrissoni

        Rhacophorus kajau
        These little gems are tiny, with eyes that seem far too big for their head. Theyre often seen sitting above very small streams.
        Rhacophorus kajau Rhacophorus kajau Rhacophorus kajau Rhacophorus kajau Rhacophorus kajau

        Rhacophorus nigropalmatus
        It took me over 2 months of searching to find this iconic species. It was certainly worth waiting for!
        Rhacophorus nigropalmatus Rhacophorus nigropalmatus Rhacophorus nigropalmatus Rhacophorus nigropalmatus Rhacophorus nigropalmatus

        Rhacophorus pardalis

        Rhacophorus pardalis Rhacophorus pardalis Rhacophorus pardalis Rhacophorus pardalis Rhacophorus pardalis

        Rhacophorus rufipes
        These two males were found perching on twigs of a fallen tree.
        Rhacophorus rufipes Rhacophorus rufipes Rhacophorus rufipes Rhacophorus rufipes Rhacophorus rufipes


    Resources:

    Frost, Darrel R. 2010. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 5.4 (8 April, 2010). Electronic Database accessible at http://research.amnh.org/vz/herpetology/amphibia/ American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA.

    Inger R F & Stuebing, 2005. A field guide to the frogs of borneo, 2nd Edition.

    Hass et al, www.frogsofborneo.org
    All photos and text are ©Andrew Johnson. email me